09 # 35334 - Practical Criticism in English Literature

# 35334 Crítica práctica de Literatura Inglesa

 

1. GENERAL INFORMATION / FITXA IDENTIFICATIVA

Code:

35334

Subject :

Crítica pràctica de la literatura anglesa

Cycle:

First

ECTS Credits:

6

Academic Year:

2014 – 2015

 

 

Type

Module

Degree:

English Studies

Compulsory

Introduction to English literature studies

Centre:

Facultat de Filologia, Traducció i Comunicació

Year:

1

Term:

2

 

Lecturer:

Departament:

Dr. Vicente Forés-López

Filologia Anglesa i Alemanya

 

2. SUMMARY / RESUM

This course has two basic components and purposes.

A ‘critical’ component aims to familiarize students with critical approaches to literary texts in English, with key concepts in the study of language, literature and culture so that they can develop the critical skills needed to understand and provide a reasoned response to literary texts in relation to issues such as gender relations, social stratification, ideological censure or religious and philosophical questions. A selection of literary works will be used throughout the course as reference texts on which different approaches will be applied. (See content units 1 to 5).

A ‘technical’ component aims to guide students in scholarly habits and in the use of resources for English Studies (including new technologies of information and communication) in order to locate and synthesize information (bibliographies, databases) and to present their own ideas (papers, projects, oral and audiovisual presentations) following citation conventions and avoiding plagiarism. (See content units 6 to 9).

 

5. LEARNING OUTCOMES/ RESULTATS D’APRENENTATGE

Having successfully completed the course, students will be able to

  • explain the basic theoretical premises, aims and methods of the types of literary criticism covered in this course,
  • synthesize how a literary text seen in class can be variously interpreted from the critical perspectives covered in this course,
  • formulate questions on a literary text from several critical approaches,
  • apply the critical concepts and methods of some of the approaches seen in class to a literary text in English,
  • explain the critical approach(es) used in a given piece of literary criticism,
  • write a stylistic commentary or ‘practical criticism’ essay,
  • write a well-structured essay using conventional academic English at B1 level,
  • find reliable sources of information for their work,
  • show the origins of the ideas employed in their writing by referencing their sources according to standard styles,
  • organize the list of works cited in their essays using the format and conventions of standard referencing styles,
  • apply the information and communication technologies used in class to their own work.

 

6. CONTENTS / DESCRIPCIÓ DE CONTINGUTS

  1. From pre-critical response to critical approaches: an overview.Description: A comparison of students’ pre-critical responses to the selected literary work’s basic elements with criticism based on a theoretical framework, exemplified in psychoanalytical and archetypal readings of the selected text. A chronology and map of critical approaches.
  2. Language-oriented criticism: Formalism, structuralism and post-structuralism (deconstruction)Description: Russian formalist criticism and New Criticism on the literariness and intrinsic elements of literary works. Structuralism: works as systems of signs; binary oppositions. Post-structuralism: the instability of meaning (J. Derrida); deconstruction as close reading of texts showing that they contradict themselves.
  3. Sociological approaches: Marxist criticism and feminist criticism.Description: Marxist: literature and class struggle; literature and ideology (M. Bakhtin’s dialogic criticism, L. Althusser, P. Macherey), Feminisms: critique of patriarchal ideology; (re)studying works written by women (S. Gilbert, S. Gubar, E. Showalter).
  4. Reader-oriented criticism.Description: affective stylistics and interpretive strategies (S. Fish); the reader and the text’s gaps (W. Iser); reader’s competence, codes and conventions (J. Culler); relating text to reader’s identity (Holland).
  5. Power and ideology in cultural studies since the 1960s.Description: The relationship between literature and other forms of discourse as examined in cultural criticism, New Historicism, post-colonial criticism, ecocriticism and gender criticism.
  6. Practising close reading in ‘practical criticism’ and stylistic commentary.Description: methods and terms in the explication of short literary texts or fragments. Practical criticism as an integrated approach.
  7. Access to primary and secondary sources.Description: Questioning and ascertaining the text being read: theory and practice of textual criticism. Questioning and ascertaining the secondary sources: indexes for the quality and reliability of information sources.
  8. Scholarly writing.Description: Structure and logic. Conventional words and phrases. Documentation: referencing sources using different styles. Avoiding plagiarism.
  9. New technologies of information and communication applied to English Studies.Description: introduction to computational tools such as reference management, databases, concordances and audiovisual presentations.

 

8. TEACHING METHODOLOGY / METODOLOGIA DOCENT

The course attempts to give more emphasis to practice than to theory, and to proceed from examining practical cases (of critical methods applied to specific texts, of real academic essays) to understanding theoretical frameworks, critical concepts and guidelines to scholarly writing.

Theory-based classes: lectures and case studies*.

Lectures will focus on clarification and discussion of key concepts and techniques rather than on exposition of matter students can find in the dossiers and bibliography. Consequently students are expected to work on assigned tasks (reading sections from course dossiers, answering questions set in advance) before attending class.

Practical classes: problem solving and case studies*.

Other activities: tutorials for orientation in preparing papers and projects

 

* About the Case Studies. Each student will have to present a case study during the first part of this course. The maximum extension should be between 4 to 6 pages only, and a maximum of 15 minutes for the oral presentation worth 1 point of the end grade.

The first thing you will have to do is decide about WHO (any author you want)  and WHAT (novel, poem, play, theory, school, movement, etc.) you want to write.

Once you have decided the WHO and What, you have to research your topic, locate in the "text" examples to base your analysis on. undertake the analysis and write out your essay either defending your own point of view, method and conclusion or quoting other peoples' pov., method or conclusions. The main questions you should be asking yourself and answering with your case study are:

The topic you have chosen ¿why is it so important? what is the context of that topic in the framework of the work you are analysing? what place does it occupy in the work? in what a relationship does this topic you selected stand with the rest of the work? what do we know today about the issue? what is today´s attitude towards the issue? why do you think the author chose that topic to write about? what was his/her main intention by chosing this topic?

These, of course, are just a few suggestions to what a case study should cover, you can find your own questions, your own answers or priorities.

salut
Dr. Forés

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For any doubts, please, visit with me Tuesday from 10:00 to 11:00 and/or Thursday from 10:00 to 12:00 in my office number 74, sixth floor of the Facultat de Filología. Please send an e-mail the previous day to make sure I am there.

Atención a Alumnos:

Martes de 10:00 a 11:00 y Jueves de 10:00 a 12:00

Despacho 074, Sexta planta de la Facultat de Filología.

Por favor, mandad un e-mail el día antes para asegurar que estaré.

 

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9. LEARNING ASSESSMENT / AVALUACIÓ

– A paper or project in English, which will have to be published by the student on her/his own at ...blogs.uv.es

– A stylistic commentary, explication or ‘practical criticism’ essay on a short literary text or fragment.

– An exam or test on the contents of the critical component.

A final average mark will only be given if all these assessment activities are marked above 4 (in a scale from 0.1 to 10, where the top mark is 10 and a pass is 5).

The assessment may be completed by other activities (portfolio or dossier, interviews at tutorials) which will be detailed in the corresponding Course Syllabus for every academic year.

The final mark will take very much into account the active involvement of students in the course, both in class and in tutorials, and their creativity.

Assessment criteria for the paper or project

  • adequate organization of concepts, argumentation and writing skills,
  • originality and relevance,
  • management of delivery terms,
  • good research for bibliography and information,
  • proper documentation,
  • avoidance of plagiarism.

IMPORTANT: Plagiarism will not be tolerated; it is a serious academic offense and therefore will be penalized by failing the course.

Assessment criteria for the stylistic commentary:

  • elucidation, and adequate expression, of the meaning(s) and theme(s) of the text,
  • effective explanation of the way the text’s meaning and effect are conveyed through its linguistic choices,
  • discussion of how the poem’s prosody contributes to its communicative purpose,
  • explanation of how the use of types of narrators and focalizing condition the unfolding of narrative.

 

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Planning/ Syllabus

2nd Semester*

(*2nd semester starts February 3rd 2015)

WEEKLY PLANNING SCHEDULE

 

WEEK 1 Tuesday, Febr. 03.2  Intro 2h Contents, methodology, evaluation method, etc.

Timeline (most of these overlap)

  • Moral Criticism, Dramatic Construction (~360 BC-present)
  • Formalism, New Criticism, Neo-Aristotelian Criticism (1930s-present)
  • Psychoanalytic Criticism, Jungian Criticism(1930s-present)
  • Marxist Criticism (1930s-present)
  • Reader-Response Criticism (1960s-present)
  • Structuralism/Semiotics (1920s-present)
  • Post-Structuralism/Deconstruction (1966-present)
  • New Historicism/Cultural Studies (1980s-present)
  • Post-Colonial Criticism (1990s-present)
  • Feminist Criticism (1960s-present)
  • Gender/Queer Studies (1970s-present)

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Thursday, Febr. 05.2 Intro 2h. prácticas, management, organization, coordination.

MLA Formatting and Style Guide

Purdue OWL: MLA Formatting - The Basics, 3:01

Purdue OWL: MLA Formatting: List of Works Cited, 8:18

Cómo citar recursos electrónicos, por Assumpció Estivill  y Cristóbal Urbano © 1997

Access to primary and secondary sources. Description: Questioning and ascertaining the text being read: theory and practice of textual criticism. Questioning and ascertaining the secondary sources: indexes for the quality and reliability of information sources.

01 Critical Evaluation of Information Sources by Uni Oregon Libraries

02 How to judge the Reliability of Internet resources by The McGraw-Hill Companies, 2001

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WEEK 2 Tuesday, Febr. 10.2 Pre-critical to critical; Primary & secondary sources

"chronology & map", minor chronology

A Hypertext Structuration of Literary Criticism

Traditional Literary Criticism

1800′s Hermeneutics, 1896 Psychoanalytic Criticism, 1900 Semiology or Semiotics, 1913 Structuralism, 1916 Formalism (Russian), 1940′s New Criticism, 1960′s Marxist Criticism Phenomenology Late 1960′s Feminism 1970′s Reader-Response Criticism.

a) Study Guide for the GRE LIT Exam (GRE= Graduate Record Examination)

b) On-line Literary Criticism Guide. ipl2

c) Voice of the Shuttle VoS: Literary Theory by Alan Liu or Literary Resources on the Net by Jack Lynch,

d) Introduction to Modern Literary Theory by Kristi Siegel.

 

 

Thursday, Febr. 12.2 Práctica 01.

01 Becker, Howard S.- Theory: the necessary evil ( A )

 

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WEEK 3 Tuesday, Febr. 17.2  Chronology & map; Scholarly writing

Formalism and New Criticism

Description: Structure and logic. Conventional words and phrases. Documentation: referencing sources using different styles. Avoiding plagiarism.

Introduction to Epistemology, 10:50 min. YouTube.

01 Scholarly Writing  Writing Centre, Walden University, 2012

02 The Purdue OWL: Academic Writing by The Writing Lab & The OWL at Purdue and Purdue University. 2013.

03 Seven secrets of stylish academic writing, Helen Sword, 13.07.2012.

04 Duke University Libraries, citing sources, avoiding plagiarism,

05 The Harvard Style: a Guide to Referencing Sources. Referencing for Electronic Sources.

 

Thursday, Febr. 19.02  Práctica 02.

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WEEK 4 Tuesday, Febr. 24.2 Formalism, structuralism, post-structuralism (Part I).

Language-oriented criticism:

a) Formalism: Russian formalist criticism and New Criticism on the literariness and intrinsic elements of literary works.

Introduction to Theory of Literature

Lecture 6 - The New Criticism and Other Western Formalisms

Lecture 7 - Russian Formalism
b) Structuralism: works as systems of signs; binary oppositions.

Lecture 8 - Semiotics and Structuralism

Jacques Lacan: Grandes pensadores del siglo XX. 1:06:11 min., la charla empieza en el minuto 00:11:30 YouTube

Lacan para multitudes: Primera sesión (1/4) a cargo de Manuel Asensi, 2:53:05.

Structuralism, a short description. 14:28 min YouTube.

Ferdinand de Saussure and Structural Linguistics by Bella Ross 5:14 min YouTube.

Noam Chomsky talking about French Intellectual Culture & Structuralism. 8:36 min. YouTube.

 

c) Post-structuralism: the instability of meaning (J. Derrida); deconstruction as close reading of texts showing that they contradict themselves.

Post-structuralism, a new lesson. 9.50 min. YouTube Animating Poststructuralism 08:58 min.

An Introduction to Poststructuralism - 1 of 3 (Derrida), 2 of 3, 3 of 3. aprox 9 min. each YouTube;

Derrida (2002): Deconstruction. 1:26:09 min.

Chomsky on Science and Postmodernism 9:18 min. YouTube

 

Thursday, Febr. 26.2  Práctica 03.

03 Hedges, Warren – Timeline of Major Critical Theories in US ( A )

The Art Story.org Art Theory Timeline. Modern Art Movements timelines: 1870s to 1980s. Art theory and art critics.

Cyberspace, Virtual Reality, and Critical Theory. Literary and Critical Theory: Individual Theorists

 

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WEEK 5 Tuesday, March 03.3 Marxism and Critical Theory + Psychoanalitic theory

Marxist Literary Theory: by Dr. Anand Prakash. University of New Dehli. 46:32 min.

Terry Eagleton: Why Marx was right. 49:30 (Why was Marx right - Terry Eagleton, Alex Callinicos, & Nina Power)

Terry Eagleton - Culture Wars - Kulturkriege

Terry Eagleton: “The Death of Criticism?” 1:09:50 min. YouTube

Psychoanalitic theory:

Slavoj Zizek, Judith Butler & Larry Rickels. Psychoanalysis. 2006

Slavoj Zizek. Object Petit a and Digital Civilization. 2014. 1:04:23 min.

Psychoanalysis and Literature: round table. 1:43:44 min.

 

Thursday, March 05.3 Práctica 04.

04 Lye, John – Contemporary Literary Theory ( A )

a) John Lye THEORY CHECKLIST: A Working Document, © 1997, 1999; b) Some Factors Affecting/Effecting the Reading of Texts, © 1996 by John Lye. c) The differences between Literary Criticism, Literary Theory and 'theory itself', © copyright John Lye 1998. d) John Lye´s Literary Theory Homepage.

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WEEK 6 Tuesday, March 10.3 Structuralism and Poststructuralism (II)

Reader-oriented criticism

01 Reader response terms and concepts.   Test your Application of Reader-response.

02 Miall-Kuiken Reader-Response Research Website

03 Explanation of Dürer Woodcut – Narratology. Felluga, Dino. "The Dürer Woodcut: Narratology." Introductory Guide to Critical Theory. Purdue U. <http://www.purdue.edu/guidetotheory/narratology/narrativeimage/>.

04 Carl Jung – El Mundo Interior 1:23:44 min.

 

Thursday, March 12.3 Práctica 05.

05 Tim O’Reilly – What is Web 2.0? Design Patterns and Business Models ( A )

a) Why Web 3.0? Slideshare Show. b) Web 3.0: The way forward? Slideshare Show. c) Web 3.0 The Semantic Web. Slideshare Show

 

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- FALLAS -

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WEEK 7 Tuesday, March 24.3 New Historicism and Cultural Materialism

1) Marxist Criticism (1930s-present)

Marxism and Literature Revisited, Volume 24, No. 2 Spring 2009 en especial:

Imre Szeman, Marxist Literary Criticism, Then and Now

2) New Historicism/Cultural Studies/Postmodernism (1980s-present):

a) Michel Foucault, – The Order of Things: An Archeology of the Human Sciences, 1970; Language, Counter-memory, Practice, 1977 b) Clifford GeertzThe Interpretation of Cultures, 1973; c) Roland Barthes, Elements of Semiology, 1964 d) Deleuze and Guattari – “Rhizome,” 1976 University of Chicago, Theories of Media, Keywords Glossary “rhizome

Thursday, March 26.3  Práctica 06

06 Wolff, Fitzpatrick & Youssef Rethinking Usability for Web 2.0 and Beyond (A)a) Web 2.0 Neglecting good design, BBC News, Technology, 2007. b) Is usability obsolete? (Part I) February, 2009

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WEEK 8 Tuesday, March 31.3

1st In-class examination - Computer test - Theory -

First 6 topics & 1st Paper due (draft published at personal blog).

 

EASTER VACATION 

 

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WEEK 9 Tuesday, April 14.4 Ethnic Studies and Postcolonial Criticism

3) Post-colonialism

Edward Said, Orientalism, 1978. On YouTube: a) Edward Said on Orientalism, 40:31, b) The Myth of the “Clash of Civilizations”. 52:03, c) Orientalism as a Tool of Colonialism 1/4 10:36

4) Feminist criticism (1960s – present)

a) Feminisms and Feminist Criticism, An overview of various feminist strategies for reconstructing knowledge by Elizabeth L. Enriques, 2007. b) Feminist Criticism and Television, by E. Ann Kaplan, 1999

 

Thursday, April 16.4  Práctica 07.

07 Larsen, Deena – Fundamentals: Rhetorical Devices for Electronic Literature ( I )

( obligatorios sólo 3 - a, b y c -, pero recomiendo leerlos todos); a) A Plea for Connections: Links convey meaning; b) This Sentence is False: Contradiction in multiple voices; c) Words and Meaning: A controversial glossary of terms

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WEEK 10 Tuesday, April 21.4 Power & ideology. Gender Studies and Queer Theory

Power and ideology in cultural studies since the 1960s. Description: The relationship between literature and other forms of discourse as examined in cultural criticism, New Historicism, post-colonial criticism, eco-criticism and gender criticism.

01 On Power & Ideology by Noam Chomsky; a) Debate N.Ch. & Michel Foucault - On Human Nature, 1:10:03, - versión subtitulada en español, muy mala calidad visual; b) What is language and why does it matter? by Noam Chomsky, 1:31:37; c) Noam Chomsky "Who Controls the Message?", 1:29:57, d) Noam Chomsky - The Militarization of Science and Space, 1:53:49;  e) Noam Chomsky "Language and Philosophy", 1:25:57.

02 Language, Power, and Ideology by Ruth Wodak,

a) Interview with Ruth Wodak: Right-wing populism in Europe, 14:31, b) Journal of Language and Politics,  c) Discourse Analysis - What Speakers Do in Conversations.

03 Discourse and Power in a Multilingual World by Adrian Blackledge, a) discourseanalysis.net.

04 George Lakoff,  "Retaking Political Discourse", 1:10:01; a) George Lakoff "The Brain and Its Politics", 1:51:12, b) G.L. on Embodied Cognition and Language, 1:28:37; c) George Lakoff | What Studying the Brain Tells Us About Arts Education, 39:53; d) Authors@Google: George Lakoff, 1:03:19.

05 Teun van Dijk. Discourse and Knowledge, 1:57:55; a) Discourse in Society, Index of Articles. b) Ideology and discourse analysis; c) The Study of discourse: an Introduction. In Teun A. van Dijk (Ed.), Discourse Studies, 5 vols. London, Sage, 2007.

 

Thursday, April 23.4  Práctica 08.

08 Moulthrop, Stuart What the Geeks Know: Hypertext and the Problem of Literacy ( A )

a) What The Geeks Know: Hypertext And Literacy from Katharina Muders (Slideshow).  b) What the geeks know from crystal53455 (Slideshow)

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WEEK 11 Tuesday, April 28.4 Close reading II. Cultural Studies reader-oriented criticism

01 TOWARDS A TRANSACTIONAL THEORY OF READING. Louise M. Rosenblatt

02 WRITING AND READING: THE TRANSACTIONAL THEORY
a) Louise M. Rosenblatt, Technical Report No. 416, New York University,  January 1988.

b) Wimsatt and Beardsley – The Intentional Fallacy and The Affective Fallacy

03 W.K.Wimsatt: The Verbal Icon

04 Stanley Fish Is there a Text in this Class?

05 Wolfgang Iser, The Implied Reader, (1972) The Act of Reading (1976)

 

Thursday, April 30.4 Práctica 09.

Practising close reading in ‘practical criticism’ and stylistic commentary. Description: methods and terms in the explication of short literary texts or fragments. Practical criticism as an integrated approach.

a) How to Do a Close Reading by Patricia Kain, 1998

b) Close reading of a literary passage by Dr. L. Kip Wheeler, 2013

c) Close Reading by Francine Prose

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WEEK 12 Tuesday, May 05.5 Formalism, structuralism, post-structuralism (deconstruction) III.

01 Walter Benjamin (1936) The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction

02 Michel Foucault, – The Order of Things: An Archeology of the Human Sciences, 1970; Language, Counter-memory, Practice, 1977

03 Clifford GeertzThe Interpretation of Cultures, 1973;

04 Paul Cilliers, Complexity and Postmodernism, 1998

05 Roland Barthes, Elements of Semiology, 1964

06 Deleuze and Guattari – “Rhizome,” 1976

07 Jean-François LyotardThe Postmodern Condition, 1979
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Thursday, Mayo 07.5. Práctica 10.

09 Pixy Ferris, Sharmila Writing Electronically The Effects of Computers on Traditional Writing ( A )

a) ECRP. Vol.1 No.1 Writing for Electronic Journals. b) A Guide: Conducting Electronic Research, CSU, Colorado State University,       c) Barnes, S. B. (1996). Literacy skills in the age of graphical interface and new media. Interpersonal Computing and Technology, 4(2), 7-26. d) Gibson, S. B. (1996a). Is all coherence gone? The role of narrative in web design. Interpersonal Computing and Technology, 4(2), 7-26.

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WEEK 13 Tuesday, May 12.5 Post-colonialism (II)

08 Edward Said, Orientalism, 1978.

On YouTube:  a) Edward Said on Orientalism, 40:31, b) The Myth of the “Clash of Civilizations”. 52:03, c) Orientalism as a Tool of Colonialism 1/4 10:36

09 Kamau Braithwaite – The History of the Voice, 1979

10 George Landow, The Postcolonial Literature and Culture Web, 2006

 

Thursday, May 14.5 Práctica 11.

10 Kendall, Robert The Birth of Electronic Literature ( A )

a) “Hyperizons: The Search for Hypertext Fiction,” Last update: July 22, 1997 by Michael Shumate.  b) The Electronic Literature Organization (ELO) c) Tracing the Growth of a New Literature, by Michael Shumate, Hypertext Fiction on the Web, 1996. d) The Perils of the "Digital Humanities": New Positivisms and the Fate of Literary Theory Tom Eyers (bio)Duquesne University, e) ALTX - Online Network, Literature in a State of Emergency, f) The Betrayal by Technology: A Portrait of Jacques Ellul (1992), 53:33

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WEEK 14 Tuesday, May 19.5 Feminist criticism (1960s – present)

11 Camile Paglia – a) Sexual Personae: b) The Androgyne in Literature and Art, 1990; c) Glittering return 2012.

12 Feminisms and Feminist Criticism, An overview of various feminist strategies for reconstructing knowledge by Elizabeth L. Enriques, 2007.

13 Feminist Criticism and Television, by E. Ann Kaplan, 1999

 

Thursday, May 21.5   Práctica 12

Presentations and Recovery.

General Works on Theory

References and Further Reading

Literary and Cultural Theory

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WEEK 15 Tuesday May 26.5

2nd Paper due, & print out of index page & on-line publication 2nd Paper

& In-class examination 50 Q

 

Exam for those who have not followed the course.

lugar y hora por determinar (vid tablón de anuncios)

(N.B. Convocatoria examen fin de curso para los Estudiantes libres y/o que no hayan asistido al curso,

ni hayan entregado papers, hecho tests, o por cualquier otra razón.

 

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Materiales para usar en clase o para auto-aprendizaje:

Week 01 & 02 Introductory Materials

Para todo el curso y que aborda casi todos los temas que vamos a tratar.

01)

Como ejemplo este mismo curso que aquí se ofrece impartido por el Profesor Paul Fry en la University of Yale y disponible on-line en internet para los que quieran profundizar en la materia.

Literary Theory

Yale UniversityThis is a survey of the main trends in twentieth-century literary theory. Lectures will provide background for the readings and explicate them where ...

Example: Lecture Description

In this first lecture, Professor Paul Fry explores the course’s title in three parts. The relationship between theory and philosophy, the question of what literature is and does, and what constitutes an introduction are interrogated. The professor then situates the emergence of literary theory in the history of modern criticism and, through an analysis of major thinkers such as Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud, provides antecedents for twentieth-century theoretical developments.

Course Description

This is a survey of the main trends in twentieth-century literary theory. Lectures will provide background for the readings and explicate them where appropriate, while attempting to develop a coherent overall context that incorporates philosophical and social perspectives on the recurrent questions: what is literature, how is it produced, how can it be understood, and what is its purpose?

Course Index

  1. Introduction to Literary Theory
  2. Introduction to Literary Theory (cont.)
  3. Ways In and Out of the Hermeneutic Circle
  4. Configurative Reading
  5. The Idea of the Autonomous Artwork

etc. etc. etc.http://academicearth.org/courses/literary-theory/

02)

Otras opciones, conceptos y puntos de vista para ver lo más importante del presente curso lo encontrarás en:

Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Literary Theory

“Literary theory” is the body of ideas and methods we use in the practical reading of literature. By literary theory we refer not to the meaning of a work of literature but to the theories that reveal what literature can mean. Literary theory is a description of the underlying principles, one might say the tools, by which we attempt to understand literature. All literary interpretation draws on a basis in theory but can serve as a justification for very different kinds of critical activity. It is literary theory that formulates the relationship between author and work; literary theory develops the significance of race, class, and gender for literary study, both from the standpoint of the biography of the author and an analysis of their thematic presence within texts. Literary theory offers varying approaches for understanding the role of historical context in interpretation as well as the relevance of linguistic and unconscious elements of the text. Literary theorists trace the history and evolution of the different genres—narrative, dramatic, lyric—in addition to the more recent emergence of the novel and the short story, while also investigating the importance of formal elements of literary structure. Lastly, literary theory in recent years has sought to explain the degree to which the text is more the product of a culture than an individual author and in turn how those texts help to create the culture.

Table of Contents

  1. What Is Literary Theory?
  2. Traditional Literary Criticism
  3. Formalism and New Criticism
  4. Marxism and Critical Theory
  5. Structuralism and Poststructuralism
  6. New Historicism and Cultural Materialism
  7. Ethnic Studies and Postcolonial Criticism
  8. Gender Studies and Queer Theory
  9. Cultural Studies
  10. References and Further Reading
    1. General Works on Theory
    2. Literary and Cultural Theory

     

03) Otra fuente que os puede ayudar mucho es:

http://bcs.bedfordstmartins.com/virtualit/poetry/critical.html

 

Critical approaches to literature reveal how or why a particular work is constructed and what its social and cultural implications are. Understanding critical perspectives will help you to see and appreciate a literary work as a multilayered construct of meaning. Reading literary criticism will inspire you to reread, rethink, and respond. Soon you will be a full participant in an endless and enriching conversation about literature.
For definitions of critical approaches, click on one of the choices to the left. Accompanying many of the definitions are essays demonstrating how to write about a poem from that particular critical approach.
Contributing authors:
Andrea Kaston, Eastern Michigan University
Michelle Ephraim, Worcester Polytechnic Institute
Ross Murfin, Southern Methodist University
Supryia M. Ray
Margaret Wald

 

04) Introductory Guide to Critical Theory

To Users of the previous Guide to Theory:

Everything that existed in the previous site also exists on this site (albeit with modifications). That includes the readings of Spenser's Sonnet 37 and 74, which you can find under the Applications section of Gender & Sex, Marxism, New Historicism, and Psychoanalysis. As a second application, I have in each section included a reading of the Dürer image associated with that section of the Guide to Theory. (The Dürer interpretations under New Historicism and Gender & Sex, however, are still under construction.) You can also click on the rhino above.

 

(published on-line in your personal blog and print out of index-page to be handed in during test).

Exams – 1st Conv. (2 sem.)

Convocatoria examen fin de curso Estudiantes libres

Tuesday 11-06-2014 aula 401 de 15:00 a 18:00

2nd Wendsday 9-07-2014 aula 401 de 15:00 a 18:00

 

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00 Listado de Textos de “Práctica” para ambos Tests –

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Artículos a discutir en clase y leer en casa

(http://www.uv.es/fores/teoriauvp.html)

 

01 Becker, Howard S.- Theory: the necessary evil ( A ) 10 pages

02 Lavagnino, John.- Reading, Scholarship, and Hypertext Editions ( A ) 10 pages

03 Hedges, Warren – Timeline of Major Critical Theories in US ( A )

04 Lye, John – Contemporary Literary Theory ( A ) 11 pages

05 Tim O’Reilly – What is Web 2.0? Design Patterns and Business Models ( A ) 16 pages

06 Wolff, Fitzpatrick & Youssef Rethinking Usability for Web 2.0 and Beyond ( A )

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Los 6 textos (01 al 06) se incluyen para el 1st Test de 20 Q(uestions),

para el 2nd Test 50 Q(uestions) entran TODOS los textos de esta lista.

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07 Larsen, Deena – Fundamentals: Rhetorical Devices for Electronic Literature ( I ) 14 pages

( obligatorios 3 -a,b y c-, pero recomiendo leerlos todos)

a) A Plea for Connections: Links convey meaning; b) This Sentence is False: Contradiction in multiple voices

c) Words and Meaning: A controversial glossary of terms

08 Moulthrop, Stuart What the Geeks Know: Hypertext and the Problem of Literacy ( A ) 9 pages

09 Pixy Ferris, Sharmila Writing Electronically The Effects of Computers on Traditional Writing ( A ) 9 pages

10 Kendall, Robert The Birth of Electronic Literature ( A ) 4 pages

to be continued…

 

TODOS los textos se pueden leer on-line o podréis adquirirlos impresos en la fotocopiadora de la Facultat (2ºpiso).

 

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10.1 Basic references:

 

Klarer, Mario. An Introduction to Literary Studies. 2nd ed. London and New York: Routledge, 2004. google books

Peck, John, and Martin Coyle. How to study a poet. London: Palgrave.

Pope, Rob. The English Studies Book. Routledge, 1998.

Guerin, W. L. et alli. A Handbook of Critical Approaches to Literature. OUP, 1992.

Gibaldi, Joseph. MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers. 6th ed. New York: Modern Language Association, 2003.

‘Critical Approaches’, VirtuaLit Interactice Poetry Tutorial Website. Bedford/St Martin’s. <http://bcs.bedfordstmartins.com/virtualit/poetry/critical.html>

Lunsford, Andrea A. The St. Martin’s Handbook. 6th edition. Bedford/St. Martin’s. <http://bcs.bedfordstmartins.com/smhandbook6e/Player/index.aspx>

Oshima, Alice, and Ann Hogue. Writing Academic English. London: Longman, 2006.

Murfin, Ross and S. M. Ray. The Bedford Glossary of Critical and Literary Terms. 3rd ed. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin, 2009.

 

10.2 Complementary references

Works on critical approaches and literary theory:

Selden, Raman, et alii. A reader’s guide to contemporary literary theory. London: Prentice Hall, 1997.

Selden, Raman. Practicing Theory and Reading Literature: An Introduction. 1989.google books

Lodge, D. (ed.) : 20th Century Literary Criticism. A Reader. Longman, 1972.

Wellek, Renè and Austin Warren. Theory of Literature. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World, 1956.

Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy A Peer-reviewed Academic Resource Literary Theory

Green, Keith and Jill LeBihan. Critical Theory and Practice: A Coursebook. London: Routledge, 1996.

Hawthorn, J. Studying the novel. London: Arnold, 2001.

Peck, John, and Martin Coyle. How to study a poet. London: Palgrave, 1988.

Peck, John, and Martin Coyle. How to Study a Shakespeare Play. 2nd ed. Basingstoke: Palgrave, 1995.

 

On scholarly writing:

Harner, James L. Literary Research Guide: A Guide to Reference Sources for the Study of Literatures in English and Related Topics. New York: Modern Language Association, 2002.

Oshima, Alice, and Ann Hogue. Writing Academic English. London: Longman, 1998.

Chicago Manuel of Style Online. <http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools.html>

McCormack, Joan and John Slaght. English for Academic Study: Extended Writing &Research Skills. Reading: Garnet, 2009.

Pallant, Anne. English for Academic Study: Writing. Reading: Garnet, 2009.

The Purdue OWL. Purdue University Writing Lab, 2010. <http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/>

Scribe, Abel, ed. MLA Style Lite for Research Papers <http://www.docstyles.com/mlacrib.htm>

 

Dictionaries, glossaries, and other reference works:

Baldick, Chris. The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms. Oxford UP, 1990.

Coyle, Martin, ed. Encyclopaedia of Literare and Criticism. London: Routledge, 1991.

Harmon, William and C. Hugh Holman. A Literature Handbook. Upper Saddle, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2000.

Fowler, Roger, ed. A Dictionary of Modern Critical Terms. London and New York: Routledge, 1987.

Preminger, Alex, and T.V:F. Brogan, eds. The New Princeton Encycolpaedia of Poetry and Poetics. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1993.

Abrams, M. H. A Glossary of Literary Terms. Forth Worth, TX: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1994.

Wales, Katie. A Dictionary of Stylistics. London: Longman, 1991.

On language, style, and prosody

Blake, N. F. An Introduction to the Language of Literature. Houndmills and London: Macmillan, 1990.

Brooks, Cleanth, and Robert Penn. Understanding Poetry. London: Holt, Rinehart & Wilson, 1968.

Carter, Ronald, ed. Language and Literature: An Introductory Reader in Stylistics. George Allen & Unwin, 1982.

Leech, G. N. & M. Short. Style in Fiction. London, Longman, 1981.

Leech, G. N. A Linguistic Guide to English Poetry. London: Longman,

Page, Norman (ed.) : The Language of Literature: A Casebook. Macmillan, 1994

Shapiro, Karl. A Prosody Handbook. Bew York: Harper and Row, 1965.

Wales, Katie. A Dictionary of Stylistics. London: Longman, 1991.

 

Practical Criticism

Gómez Lara, Manuel J., and Juan A. Prieto Pablos. The ways of the word : an advanced course on reading and the analysis of literary texts Huelva : Universidad de Huelva, 1994.

Lázaro Carreter, Fernando, y Evaristo Correa Calderón. Cómo se comenta un texto literario. Madrid: Cátedra, 1978.

Lennard, John.  The poetry handbook : a guide to reading poetry for pleasure and practical criticism Oxford  Oxford University Press, 1996

López Casanova, Arcadio, y Eduardo Alonso. Poesía y novela: teoría, método de análisis y práctica textual. Valencia: Bello, 1982.

Miller, Lindy. Mastering Practical Criticism. Basingstoke: Plagrave, 2001.

 

—–

Complementary references in alphabetical order:

Abrams, M. H. A Glossary of Literary Terms. Forth Worth, TX: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1994.

Baldick, Chris. The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms. Oxford UP, 1990.

Blake, N. F. An Introduction to the Language of Literature. Houndmills and London: Macmillan, 1990.

Brooks, Cleanth, and Robert Penn. Understanding Poetry. London: Holt, Rinehart & Wilson, 1968.

Carter, Ronald, ed. Language and Literature: An Introductory Reader in Stylistics. George Allen & Unwin, 1982.

Chicago Manuel of Style Online. <http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools.html>

Coyle, Martin, ed. Encyclopaedia of Literature and Criticism. London: Routledge, 1991.

Fowler, Roger, ed. A Dictionary of Modern Critical Terms. London and New York: Routledge, 1987.

Gómez Lara, Manuel J., and Juan A. Prieto Pablos. The ways of the word : an advanced course on reading and the analysis of literary texts Huelva : Universidad de Huelva, 1994.

Green, Keith and Jill LeBihan. Critical Theory and Practice: A Coursebook. London: Routledge, 1996.

Harmon, William and C. Hugh Holman. A Literature Handbook. Upper Saddle, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2000.

Harner, James L. Literary Research Guide: A Guide to Reference Sources for the Study of Literatures in English and Related Topics. New York: Modern Language Association, 2002.

Hawthorn, J. Studying the novel. London: Arnold, 2001.

Lázaro Carreter, Fernando, y Evaristo Correa Calderón. Cómo se comenta un texto literario. Madrid: Cátedra, 1978.

Leech, G. N. & M. Short. Style in Fiction. London, Longman, 1981.

Leech, G. N. A Linguistic Guide to English Poetry. London: Longman,

Lennard, John.  The poetry handbook : a guide to reading poetry for pleasure and practical criticism Oxford  Oxford University Press, 1996

Lodge, D. ed. 20h Century Literary Criticism. A Reader. Longman, 1972.

López Casanova, Arcadio, y Eduardo Alonso. Poesía y novela: teoría, método de análisis y práctica textual. Valencia: Bello, 1982.

McCormack, Joan and John Slaght. English for Academic Study: Extended Writing &Research Skills. Reading: Garnet, 2009.

Miller, Lindy. Mastering Practical Criticism. Basingstoke: Plagrave, 2001.

Page, Norman, ed. The Language of Literature: A Casebook. Macmillan, 1994

Pallant, Anne. English for Academic Study: Writing. Reading: Garnet, 2009.

Peck, John, and Martin Coyle. How to study a poet. London: Palgrave, 1988.

Peck, John, and Martin Coyle. How to Study a Shakespeare Play. 2nd ed. Basingstoke: Palgrave, 1995.

Preminger, Alex, and T.V:F. Brogan, eds. The New Princeton Encyclopaedia of Poetry and Poetics. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1993.

The Purdue OWL. Purdue University Writing Lab, 2010. <http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/>

Scribe, Abel, ed. MLA Style Lite for Research Papers <http://www.docstyles.com/mlacrib.htm>

Selden, Raman, et al. A reader’s guide to contemporary literary theory. London: Prentice Hall, 1997.

Selden, Raman. Practising Theory and Reading Literature: An Introduction. New York: Harvester Wheatsheaf, 1989.

Shapiro, Karl. A Prosody Handbook. New York: Harper and Row, 1965.

Wales, Katie. A Dictionary of Stylistics. London: Longman, 1991.

Wellek, Renè and Austin Warren. Theory of Literature. New york: Harcourt, Brace & World, 1956.

 

 

 

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Appendix A.

*********************

start copying after *** and paste into your blog page.

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FIRST/SECOND PAPER


Subject : # 35334 Crítica práctica de Literatura Inglesa

Student´s name: apellido apellido, nombre

Title of the paper: ñaldñlajfañljf añlfañljf añldjañlsjdalñ

Author or topic: nombre del autor (with a link to wikipedia)

 

Abstract: (no more than 100 words)

Elkja sñadjalksjdf añlfkañfl Introduction Elkja sñadjalksjdf añlfkañfl akfñalfk ñlfkafñl añlfkañlfasfñljafñ dljf añlfañljf añldjañlsjdalñ añljfdal njkahsfjajhdh01 añladfjañlfj ñaldñlajfañljf añlfañljf añldjañlsjdalñ añljfda njkahsfjajhdh02 fñl añlfkañlfasfñljafñ dldlkjdlñddñkasdlñaslkd añdjj añfa añladfjañlfj ñaldñlajfañljf añlfañljf añldjañlsjdalñ añljfdanjkahsfjajhdh03 fñl añlfkañlfasfñljafñ dldañldjañlsjdalñ añljfdanjkahsfjajhdh04 we cannjkahsfjajhdh05 ee tfñl añlfkañlfasfñljafñ dldlkjdlñddñkasdlñaslkd añdjj añfa añladfjañlfj ñaldñ añljfdahe Conclusion fñl añlfkañlfasfñljafñ dldlkjdlñddñkasdlñaslkd añdjj añfa añladfjañlfj ñaldñlajfañljf añlfañljf.

Bibliography, URL’s

 

Auto-evaluation:

Opción a) 5 – 7 – 9- 10

Opción b) Aprobado – Notable – Sobresaliente – M.H.

Opción c) ¿ñaldñ lajfañljf añl fañljf añld jañls jdalñ …. (literaria)?

Elige una opción

 

Academic year 2014/2015
© a.r.e.a./Dr.Vicente Forés López
© aquí tu nombre
usuario@alumni.uv.es

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